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Eradicating Inequities in Urologic Care and Outcomes is a Profound Quality Improvement Initiative

  • Yaw A. Nyame
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author: Yaw Nyame, MD, MS, MBA, Department of Urology, University of Washington, 1959 NE Pacific St, Seattle, WA, USA 98195, Tel: +001-206-685-1982, Fax: +001-206-543-3272
    Affiliations
    Department of Urology, University of Washington, Seattle WA

    Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center; Seattle WA
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  • Tracy M. Downs
    Affiliations
    Department of Urology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA
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      In 2000, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) published its report To Err is Human: Building a Safer System,
      To Err Is Human: Building a Safer Health System.
      which provided data demonstrating the impact of medical errors on adverse clinical outcomes for patients in the US. The IOM report demonstrated that an estimated 98,000 individuals in the US died from medical errors, which made medical errors the 7th leading cause of death in the US.
      To Err Is Human: Building a Safer Health System.
      The report was a pivotal moment in US healthcare, in which quality improvement initiatives became top priorities across our health systems. These changes were further driven by the 2001 IOM report, Crossing the Quality Chasm: A New Health System for the 21st Century which defined high quality care as (1) safe, (2) effective, (3) patient-centered, (4) timely, (5) efficient, and (6) equitable.

      Committee on Quality of Health Care in America. Crossing the Quality Chasm: (317382004-001). doi:10.1037/e317382004-001

      To achieve higher quality care, we developed various systems of checks and balances to monitor, measure and incentivize the reduction of adverse outcomes across a wide range of health services and clinical processes that included initiatives to eliminate medication errors and never events such as wrong site operations.
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      References

      1. To Err Is Human: Building a Safer Health System.
        National Academies Press, 2000: 9728https://doi.org/10.17226/9728
      2. Committee on Quality of Health Care in America. Crossing the Quality Chasm: (317382004-001). doi:10.1037/e317382004-001

      3. Health WC on SD of, Organization WH. Closing the Gap in a Generation: Health Equity Through Action on the Social Determinants of Health : Commission on Social Determinants of Health Final Report. World Health Organization; 2008.

      4. World Health Organization. A Conceptual Framework for Action on the Social Determinants of Health: Debates, Policy & Practice, Case Studies; 2010. Accessed April 10, 2020. http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/44489/1/9789241500852_eng.pdf

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