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Twitter and Instagram Use in the Urology Residency Application Process

Published:October 09, 2021DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.urology.2021.08.046

      ABSTRACT

      Objective

      To define urology applicant attitudes and usage trends of social media (SM) during the 2021 urology match cycle.

      Methods

      We emailed an anonymous, de-identified 22-question, multiple choice survey to all applicants to our institution for the 2021 Urology Residency Match. We asked participants about use of SM and which aspects they found useful in the application process. Univariate descriptive analyses were conducted based on survey responses. Chi-square analyses were performed to define significant differences in use of social media and resultant match outcomes.

      Results

      Of the 528 students who registered for the 2021 AUA Match, 398 received our survey (75%), and 144 responded (27% of applicants nationwide). Of survey participants, 49% made a new account on Twitter while 30% had a preexisting account. Most participants (71%) had a preexisting Instagram account, while only 3% made a new account. Most participants agreed Twitter was used as a source to gather information about programs (84%) and learn about events (89%). Participants found SM most helpful for announcing event dates (71%) and highlighting resident social life (59%). Applicants did not match more highly on their rank lists if they used Twitter (P = .427) or Instagram (P = .166) and were not more likely to get more interviews if they used Twitter (P = .246) or Instagram (P = .114)

      Conclusion

      Applicants found Twitter to be an important source of information through the virtual interview process. Despite the use of SM by most applicants, published content did not impact rank list decisions nor did SM engagement predict match outcomes.
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