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Outcomes of the Supris Sling in an Urban Latina Population

Published:October 09, 2021DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.urology.2021.07.054

      Abstract

      Objective

      To analyze patient reported outcomes, safety, and efficacy of the Supris mid-urethral sling in a diverse population.

      Methods

      A retrospective chart review of 101 women who underwent a mid-urethral Suprissling procedure was conducted. Baseline characteristics and perioperative parameters were collected. Post-operative results and patient reported outcomes were collected at an average follow-up time of 19 months using the Urogenital Distress Inventory-6 (UDI-6) and Patient Global Impression of Improvement (PGI-I) validated questionnaires. Subjective cure rates were compared using the nonparametric Wilcoxon Rank Sum Test.

      Results

      The median age of women was 57 years old, and 86.1% identified as Latina. 28% and 72% of women had a SUI and MUI diagnosis, respectively. Women, on average, used 2 pads pre-operatively and none post-operatively. There was a 3% surgical revision rate. 80 women completed the questionnaires. 82% of the MUI group reported being very much improved or much better. The SUI group reported being 94% very much improved or much better. The UDI-6 questions related to urgency and leakage of small amounts of urine were significantly different between the MUI and SUI groups (P = .002 and P = .044).

      Conclusion

      In our primarily Latina patient population, the majority of whom had MUI, the Supris retropubic sling greatly improved symptoms. Although reported outcomes were excellent in both groups, those with pre-operative urge incontinence were more likely to experience urge symptoms post-operatively. Despite persistent urge symptoms, patients reported improvement of their overall symptoms.
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