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About Time: Assessing Time Spent in Urology Ambulatory Visits and Patient Race

  • Julie A. Szymaniak
    Affiliations
    Department of Urology, University of California, San Francisco, USA

    Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, USA
    Search for articles by this author
  • Anobel Y. Odisho
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence to: Anobel Odisho, Department of Urology, University of California, San Francisco
    Affiliations
    Department of Urology, University of California, San Francisco, USA

    Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, USA
    Search for articles by this author
      Racial disparities in the diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes of many urologic diseases are well-documented. Nationally, Black men are more than twice as likely to die of prostate cancer as white men, with both higher incidence and worse outcomes after diagnosis.
      National Cancer Institute
      SEER Cancer Statistics Review 1975-2015.
      Bladder cancer survival is also lower, as Black patients present with more advanced disease and have lower rates of receipt of optimal treatment.
      • Sung JM
      • Martin JW
      • Jefferson FA
      • et al.
      Racial and socioeconomic disparities in bladder cancer survival: analysis of the California cancer registry.
      • Marinaro J
      • Zeymo A
      • Egan J
      • et al.
      Sex and racial disparities in the treatment and outcomes of muscle-invasive bladder cancer.
      Clearly, a complex interplay between biology, access, patterns of care, and socioeconomic and cultural factors affects how vulnerable populations with urologic pathologies fare. The importance of equal access was explored by Riviere et al, who found that Black patients within the Veterans Affairs healthcare system had, in fact, a slightly lower prostate cancer-specific mortality compared to their non-Hispanic White counterparts.
      • Riviere P
      • Luterstein E
      • Kumar A
      • et al.
      Survival of African American and non-hispanic white men with prostate cancer in an equal-access health care system.
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      References

        • National Cancer Institute
        SEER Cancer Statistics Review 1975-2015.
        2018 (Updated September 10Accessed July 26, 2021)
        • Sung JM
        • Martin JW
        • Jefferson FA
        • et al.
        Racial and socioeconomic disparities in bladder cancer survival: analysis of the California cancer registry.
        Clin Genitourin Cancer. 2019; 17: e995-e1002https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clgc.2019.05.008
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        • Zeymo A
        • Egan J
        • et al.
        Sex and racial disparities in the treatment and outcomes of muscle-invasive bladder cancer.
        Urology. 2021; 151: 154-162https://doi.org/10.1016/j.urology.2020.06.087
        • Riviere P
        • Luterstein E
        • Kumar A
        • et al.
        Survival of African American and non-hispanic white men with prostate cancer in an equal-access health care system.
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