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EDITORIAL COMMENT

  • Stanley K. Frencher
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence to: Stanley K Frencher Jr, MD, MPH, Medical Director Surgical Outcomes and Quality, Martin Luther King Jr Community Hospital, Associate Professor of Urology, UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine, 10833 Le Conte Ave, Los Angeles, CA.
    Affiliations
    Department of Urology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA

    Martin Luther King Jr Community Hospital, Los Angeles, CA
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      Antoine, et al performed a retrospective, multivariate analysis of factors affecting odds of undergoing surgery. Predictive variable was hypothesized to be race/ethnicity with covariates study from a hospital network database between 2011 and 2018: age, insurance state, comorbid conditions and type of medical therapy. The outcome of interest was likelihood of undergoing surgical treatment for LUTS/BPH. The authors reviewed the records of over 30,000 patients with a racial breakdown percentage of 80, 9, 4, and 7 respectively (e.g., White, LatinX, Black and other race/ethnicity). They found that Black patients were less likely to undergo surgery than White patients with statistically significant OR 0.61 as were patients of "other race/ethnicity" (OR 0.72). The authors concede that their study does not elucidate the underlying causes for the observed inequity and that their database lacked information of severity of LUTS, was limited in geography, and did not have complete comorbidity information.
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