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AUTHOR REPLY

  • Di An
    Affiliations
    Department of Urology, China Rehabilitation Research Center, Beijing, China

    School of Rehabilitation, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China

    Department of Physiotherapy, China Rehabilitation Research Center, Beijing, China
    Search for articles by this author
  • Fan Zhang
    Affiliations
    Department of Urology, China Rehabilitation Research Center, Beijing, China

    School of Rehabilitation, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China
    Search for articles by this author
  • Limin Liao
    Affiliations
    Department of Urology, China Rehabilitation Research Center, Beijing, China

    School of Rehabilitation, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China
    Search for articles by this author
      The studies of Wolin et al. and Li et al. confirmed that obesity and age are 2 important factors affecting post-prostatectomy incontinence (PPI).
      • Wolin KY
      • Luly J
      • Sutcliffe S
      • Andriole GL
      • Kibel AS
      Risk of urinary incontinence following prostatectomy: the role of physical activity and obesity.
      ,
      • Li X
      • Zhang H
      • Jia Z
      • et al.
      Urinary continence outcomes of four years of follow-up and predictors of early and late urinary continence in patients undergoing robot-assisted radical prostatectomy.
      We speculate that younger patients may recover from PPI faster. Younger patients (<70 years) have better muscle compliance of contraction and relaxation, which makes neural recruitment of the target muscle easier.
      • Li X
      • Zhang H
      • Jia Z
      • et al.
      Urinary continence outcomes of four years of follow-up and predictors of early and late urinary continence in patients undergoing robot-assisted radical prostatectomy.
      Moreover, obesity may increase abdominal pressure, which further increases the contractive burden of pelvic floor muscles.
      • Wolin KY
      • Luly J
      • Sutcliffe S
      • Andriole GL
      • Kibel AS
      Risk of urinary incontinence following prostatectomy: the role of physical activity and obesity.
      We hypothesize that patients with higher BMI may be associated with slower recovery rate of PPI. As more patients being recruited in our study, we will compare the recovery rates of PPI in different age, and BMI groups in the future.
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      Reference

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        Urinary continence outcomes of four years of follow-up and predictors of early and late urinary continence in patients undergoing robot-assisted radical prostatectomy.
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