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EDITORIAL COMMENT

      Black, Latinx, and female physicians represent 2.0%, 3.9%, and 9.9% of practicing urologists in the United States, respectively.

      American Urological Association. The state of the urology workforce and practice in the United States. 2019. Available at:https://www.auanet.org/research/research-resources/aua-census/census-results. Accessed July 10, 2020.

      For comparison, 13.4%, 18.5%, and 50.1% of the 2019 US population identified as Black, Latinx, and female. Modest improvements have occurred in the representative diversity of our workforce with increasing numbers of Black (3.1%), Latinx (5.7%), and female (29.4%) urology residents in the 2019 AUA census.

      American Urological Association. Urologists in training: residents and fellows in the United States. Available at: https://www.auanet.org/research/research-resources/aua-census/census-results. Accessed July 10, 2020.

      Recognizing the importance of workforce diversity—and its role in improving clinical care and research—the time has come for our field to better understand what barriers exist in our recruitment of URM students. In this study, Wong et al examine the experience of pursuing urology among under-represented in medicine (URM) and female urology applicants to a large, urban academic residency program in the United States.
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      References

      1. American Urological Association. The state of the urology workforce and practice in the United States. 2019. Available at:https://www.auanet.org/research/research-resources/aua-census/census-results. Accessed July 10, 2020.

      2. United States Census Bureau. ACS demographic and housing estimates. Available at:https://data.census.gov/cedsci/table?g=0100000US.04000.001&hidePreview=false&tid=ACSDP1Y2018.DP05&vintage=2018&cid=S0101_C01_001E&layer=VT_2018_040_00_PP_D1. Accessed July 13, 2020

      3. American Urological Association. Urologists in training: residents and fellows in the United States. Available at: https://www.auanet.org/research/research-resources/aua-census/census-results. Accessed July 10, 2020.

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