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Association Between Stress Urinary Incontinence and the Components of Metabolic Syndrome Among Females 20-59 Years

      Abstract

      Objective

      To assess the relationship between stress urinary incontinence (SUI) and metabolic syndrome among a population-based cohort of women 20-59 years.

      Methods

      National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey database was used between the years of 2013 and 2016 and included women aged 20-59 years. SUI was defined as “Urinary leakage with physical activity.” Metabolic syndrome was defined as >2 risk factors: fasting blood glucose (FBG) >99 mg/dL, triglyceride >149 mg/dL, high-density lipoprotein <50 mg/dL, waistline >88 cm, and blood pressure >130/85. We generated weighted estimated prevalence and ran multivariable logistic regression models.

      Results

      Among 3430 female subjects, the estimated prevalence of SUI was 38.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 36.7-40.7%) and metabolic syndrome was 10.2% (95% CI 8.9-11.6). Higher rates of SUI were seen with large waistlines, elevated FBG, and elevated triglycerides. Among women with metabolic syndrome, 56.1% (95% CI 39.7-49.0%) had SUI. Among all women, metabolic syndrome and elevated FBG significantly increase the risk of SUI (odds ratio [OR] 1.53 [95% CI 1.02-2.28] and OR 1.86 [95% CI 1.14-3.03], respectively). In women 20-39 years, a large waistline significantly increased the risk of SUI (OR 1.72 [95% CI 1.00-2.99]).

      Conclusion

      Among females 20-59 years in the United States, 38.7% report SUI and 10% have metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome and an elevated FBG significantly increase the risk of SUI among all women. A large waistline increases the risk of SUI in women aged 20-39 years. Weight loss and adequate control of metabolic syndrome should be considered key strategies in the management of SUI.
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