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Physical Activity as a Protective Factor for Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms in Male Patients: A Prospective Cohort Analysis

Published:January 09, 2019DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.urology.2018.12.035

      ABSTRACT

      Objective

      To assess the association between physical activity, evaluated by the Physical Activity Scale for Elderly (PASE) questionnaire and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in male patients.

      Methods

      From 2009 onward, a consecutive series of patients with LUTS-benign prostatic enlargement were enrolled. Symptoms were evaluated using the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) with its subscores and prostate volume using transrectal ultrasound. Physical activity was evaluated with the PASE questionnaire, consisting of 12 questions regarding frequency and duration of leisure activity and recently used to evaluate physical activity in patients with prostatic disorders. The risk of detecting LUTS (IPSS ≥8), voiding LUTS (vIPSS≥5), and storage LUTS (sLUTS) (sIPSS ≥4) was evaluated using binary logistic regression analysis.

      Results

      Six hundred and seventeen patients were enrolled in 2 centers (Rome, Vasto, Italy). Median PASE score was 118 (IQR 73/169), and median IPSS was 9 (IQR 5/15). Overall 189 of 617 (30%) patients presented moderate/severe LUTS. These patients presented a lower PASE score (111 IQR 69/160 vs 125 IQR 83/180; P = .016) when compared to patients with total IPSS ≤7.
      On multivariate analysis, PASE score (OR = 0.997 per unit, 95%CI: 0.994-1.000; P = .023), and prostate volume (OR = 1.008 per mL, 1.000-1.016; P = .045) were independent predictors of LUTS severity. As well PASE score was an independent predictor of moderate/severe sLUTS (OR = 0.996, 95%CI:0.993-0.999; P = .015).

      Conclusion

      In our study a reduced physical activity, assessed using the PASE questionnaire, is associated with an increased risk of moderate severe LUTS, more specifically of moderate/severe sLUTS.
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